When You Really Need a Favour, Ask in Person


When you want to ask your colleagues for a favour to review your draft presentation, lend some resources to an important project, or even to support you in your local charity run — it feels most efficient to send a group email.

But a new study finds that people tend to overestimate the power of their persuasiveness over text and email and underestimate how effective face-to-face requests are.

Asking someone in person is far more likely to be successful.

Remember that most people have an inbox full of requests from people. You don’t want your favour to get lost in that heap. Sure, going to talk to someone may be less convenient and more uncomfortable, but if you really need someone to help you out, stop by their desk or schedule a meeting.

Doing so demonstrates the importance of the task and cuts through the digital clutter.

Adapted from “A Face-to-Face Request Is 34 Times More Successful than an Email,” by Vanessa K. Bohns

 

FAV 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

@trevorblee

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Before Your Next Job Interview, Rehearse in Character


Be yourself” is horrible advice for someone going on a job interview.

That’s because you are literally auditioning for a new role. Take the time to craft your “job interview character” by making a list of the qualities a successful candidate should convey. And then rehearse. For example, if you tend to be shy, expand your range of expression (and what you’re comfortable doing) by practicing what might feel like an exaggerated performance, using hand gestures and passion. And try to reframe your perspective. Instead of performing as a person who is trying really hard to get the job, perform as someone who wants to have a great conversation with the interviewer.

Ask open-ended questions and be prepared to tell stories.

Adapted from “To Ace Your Job Interview, Get into Character and Rehearse,” by Cathy Salit

people

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

@trevorblee

Be More Loyal to Your Mentee


All too often, mentoring can become just another task on your to-do list.

But mentoring requires developing a genuine rapport. Studies show that even the best-designed mentoring programs are no substitute for an authentic, collegial relationship between mentor and mentee. You need a baseline chemistry with your mentee, and you must have their best interests at heart — even if those interests aren’t the same as the company’s.

Of course, it would be great if your mentee wanted to sustain a long career at your organization, but it’s more important to help them discover their strengths and passions and the best place to apply both. When counseling your mentee on career decisions, encourage them to find their calling whether it’s at your company or somewhere else.

This is the best way to inspire commitment.

Adapted from “What the Best Mentors Do,” by Anthony K. Tjan

MENTOR 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

http://www.ep-i.net

@trevorblee

Leadership Presence


Increasing your Leadership Presence involves complex, interrelated factors.

  1. Identify and clarify your vision of the future, not only for yourself but for those you lead, or want to lead. Document your vision (in writing!) and then communicate it in a way that inspires people to follow it.

  2. Consider how you appear to others. Start with your appearance, but give more than a passing glance at your inner self and soul (or whatever you call that intangible part of you that projects your values.) Do something to improve at least one of the above, every day.

  3. Get some practice in leaving decisions to other people, especially to those who really want to contribute in the way that decision-making requires. (This sounds easier than it is. People who want to lead generally like to be in control.)

Leadership Presence is a path, not a destination.

LEADERSHIP PRES 1

Curated by Trevor Lee
tblee@ep-i.net
http://www.ep-i.net
@trevorblee

 

Pursue a Second Career — Without Having to Leave Your First One


Do you dream about changing careers but worry that the costs of switching are too high — and that the possibility of success seems too remote?

Instead of plugging away in your current job, unfulfilled and slowly burning out, do both: Keep your current job while pursuing your new career.

You don’t have to forgo sleep if you can find ways to enhance your existing role with your new pursuit.

For example, if you’re interested in becoming a public speaker, look for ways to build your presentation skills within your current company.

Volunteer to take on the next company-wide presentation or join a panel at a conference.

When you follow your curiosities, you’re more likely to feel fulfilled in life — and to be more satisfied in all of your roles.

Adapted from “Why You Should Have (at Least) Two Careers,” by Kabir Sehgal

LEADERSHIP PRES 1

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Freelancers, Take Control of Your Meeting Schedule


One of the biggest advantages of being self-employed is having the flexibility to dictate your schedule.

Many freelancers find themselves frittering away their days,

unsure of how to leverage their autonomy.

One way to be more efficient is to cluster all your client meetings on the same days. Those days will be long and intense, but they’ll allow you unfettered productive work on the other days.

This is especially important if you have to travel for your meetings: If you can tackle multiple meetings downtown on one day, you’ve saved yourself hours of painful commuting. And before you even agree to that in-person meeting, make sure it’s a good use of your time.

Ask questions about the agenda, and only attend if an important issue needs to be discussed and decided. Otherwise, gently suggest that you’re available by phone or email.

Adapted from “Scheduling Meetings Effectively When You’re Self-Employed,” by Dorie Clark

FREELANCE

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Before Taking an Expat Assignment, Make Sure Your Family Is on Board


Getting an expat assignment can be exciting, but it can also be hard on your family. Before accepting a temporary reassignment to another country, think it through with your partner or family. Be sure to frame the decision as a real choice:

Should we go or stay?

And consider the degree of change: If you live in Amsterdam, relocating to Brussels is very different from moving to Guangzhou, China.

Then go through the pros and cons of each alternative, laying out the full implications for your children or extended family, your career — and your partner’s — and your support networks.

Try to anticipate and discuss how the change would affect family dynamics — e.g., shifting from a dual-career marriage to one where a spouse stays at home, or replacing a grandmother babysitter with a professional nanny.

These discussions will not only shape your decision about the assignment but also help set expectations and prevent resentment later on.

Adapted from “Making Your Expat Assignment Easier on Your Family,” by Katia Vlachos

EXPAT 1

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee