Networking: Don’t Default to “Let’s Meet for Coffee”


“Meeting for coffee” has become our professional default when it comes to networking, but it doesn’t have to be that way.

Next time you’re setting up time to get to know someone, whether you were introduced or met briefly at an event, consider one of these options instead: doing a 30-minute phone call, a 60-minute phone call, a small group gathering (like a lunch or dinner), a large group event (like a cocktail reception), or a meal with just the two of you.

The best option will depend on how much time and energy you want to put into the relationship. If you’re doing a favor for a friend, spending several hours dining one-on-one with your contact is going above and beyond — a phone call would likely suffice.

Alternatively, if you think the person could become a personal friend, you may want to invite them to a more relaxed event, where you can get to know them better.

Adapted from “When You Agree to a Networking Meeting
But Don’t Know What You’re Going to Talk About,”  by Dorie Clark

NETWORK 2

Trevor Lee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

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Establish Trust in your Virtual Team


 You can gauge the health of a virtual team by measuring the average lag time between when team members identify a problem and when they discuss it.

If you and your colleagues don’t trust one another, issues will go unaddressed for much longer than they should.

That’s why it is critical for members of a virtual team to establish trust and a sense of safety up front.

Trusting people is hard when you don’t work with them face-to-face, but even the smallest of gestures can help: Be generous with information.

If someone is struggling with a project or task, be the first to offer help. And when someone on the team has even a minor success, send a congratulatory email.

A little kindness goes a long way in encouraging others to give you the benefit of the doubt

when stresses inevitably arise.

Adapted from “How to Raise Sensitive Issues During a Virtual Meeting,”
by Joseph Grenny

TRUST 4

 

Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

@trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

 

Empathy


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Use Empathy to Improve Your Next Meeting

Improving meetings isn’t just about inviting the right people and being prepared. You also need to employ empathy, an emotional intelligence competency that can help you better manage discussions.

Empathy allows you to read people: Who is supporting whom? Who is coasting? Where is the resistance?

Carefully reading people will also help you understand the conflicts in the group so that you can manage the power dynamics. You may think these sorts of politics are unimportant, but power matters — and it plays out in meetings. Learning to read how the flow of power is moving and shifting can help you lead the group.

It’s your job to make sure people leave your meeting feeling good about what happened, their contributions, and you as the leader.

Adapted from the HBR Emotional Intelligence Series

EMPATHY 2

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Encourage Collaboration – Make It Easier


Collaboration takes time and resources. So if you want people to work together, you have to make it as easy as possible.

For example, you can use simple, off-the-shelf tools like Dropbox and Skype to help people share and communicate. (Be sure that any programs you use work seamlessly with your IT system.)

If some of your employees aren’t confident with the technology, pair them with someone who is. People are much more likely to adopt a new technology if they have someone they can turn to for help, rather than learning it on their own or relying on an IT hotline.

And for major collaboration projects, consider assigning co-leaders who can shoulder the administrative burdens.

Adapted from “How to Get People to Collaborate When You Don’t Control Their Salary,”
by Heidi K. Gardner

MIDDLE

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Knowing if Executive Education really works


A guest post co-authored by Alan Matcham and Tim Coburn who are partners at Accelerance.co. Developing leaders who drive business performance using advanced and engaging learning principles.

Introduction

The holy grail of most organisations offering executive education interventions is knowing and justifying if they really work. Reflecting on what traditionally happens this paper sets out to propose a more imaginative and relevant way of tracking the success (or not) of executive education interventions. We suggest the focus needs to be more on what is learnt not how people feel and more in tune with the means of design not just the ends.

A recent McKinsey report; “Why Leadership Development Programmes Fail”, highlighted the following research findings:

  • US companies spend almost $14 billion annually on leadership development.
  • Customised leadership development offerings from top business schools can reach $150,000 a person.
  • 500 executives ranked their top three human-capital priorities; leadership development was included as both a current and a future priority.
  • Only 7 percent of senior managers polled by a UK business school think that their companies develop global leaders effectively
  • Around 30 percent of US companies admit they lack enough leaders with the right capabilities.

Professor Jeff Pfeffer of Stanford University in his article; “Getting beyond the BS of leadership literature”, states the US spend could actually be as much as $50bn. He goes on to say that;”Leaders aren’t doing a good job for themselves or their workplaces, and things don’t seem to be improving.”

From this evidence, a conscientious Leadership Development professional may be perfectly entitled to conclude that investing in Leadership Development Programmes and interventions is an expensive waste of time and money with questionable returns.

The counter argument is that whilst the cost of Executive Education may appear high, the cost of Executive ignorance is significantly higher. That doesn’t however negate the need for the pursuit of more helpful, relevant and accurate measures of success.

In his article; “The Corporate Leadership Landscape”, Tim Coburn highlights the complex contextual environment today’s Executives have to operate in. There is no doubt they live in a world where the shelf life of knowledge is getting shorter and shorter and the need to learn continuously is a must, not a nice to have. If Executives are to remain valuable and valued resourceful humans, they need to focus on the complex not the repetitive, the unknown not the known, and increasingly on the future not today because “today” is being standardised, outsourced, automated and digitised.

From the evidence, a conscientious Leadership Development professional may be perfectly entitled to conclude that investing in Leadership Development Programmes and interventions is an expensive waste of time and money with questionable returns.

Whichever report you choose to read there is little doubt that Executive Development is crucially important. The growing dilemma facing all those responsible for Executive Development is how do we know if our investment will provide the value and returns we seek? The answer of course is that there is no simple answer! Having said that we would like to show that there are many surrogates which can help point the way and, when taken in the round, provide strong evidence for progress.

The Purpose of Executive Education

Given the challenges faced by the leaders of today’s companies, we believe the sole purpose of executive education should be to enable executives to learn and learn how to learn, and in doing so apply that to improving themselves and their organisations.

For individual leaders, the ability to learn has already been identified as the strongest factor in determining their potential to succeed. And for organisations, the ability to adapt and change has become so obviously critical to their survival.

The Traditional Approach

The most widely used method of measuring the effectiveness of Executive Education Programmes, is the classic “Happy Sheet”, or delegate feedback form. These are designed to gather feedback on the quality of content, speakers, learning experiences, the venue and administrative support. Using a combination of closed (rating scale) and open questions, delegates are asked to evaluate and report on their experience.

The fundamental design flaw and perhaps unintended consequence of this sort of measurement mechanism is that it invariably forces Executives to make one dimensional judgements of; good/bad, yes/no, like/don’t like and not make more valuable self-reflections on their own learning experience and feelings.

If the purpose of executive education is to create people with the ability to learn how to learn then reinforcing such a judgemental approach is damaging and counterproductive to that aim.

The evaluation of a delegates learning experience is crucial but in doing so, we should be asking questions with a known correlation to an improvement of thinking and behaviour in job performance, like some of those identified by ABDI’s research:

  • Were the personal and collective objectives achieved? (effectiveness)

  • Was the content relevant to your role? (relevance)

  • Do you have an implementable action plan to apply your new insights? (action plan)

  • Were you challenged and supported in relation to your individual and collective assumptions? (insights)

  • Would you recommend this programme to colleagues? (willingness to recommend)

As useful as these questions are however, we believe they only go part of the way in addressing the real purpose of executive education.

A Different Perspective

Given the emphasis on learning – as well as the emphasis on improving performance – knowing if Executive Education Programmes work becomes a function of both means and ends. By means we refer to the underpinning pedagogical and design principles and processes of any intervention. The way a programme is designed will dictate whether ‘learning to learn’ and ‘improving yourself and your organisation’ actually happens.

The design principles we believe in ensure we address the purpose of executive education as we see it. In doing so, they also provide an alternative set of measurement criteria that can be used for evaluating impact. These principles include:

  • The importance of working on real issues – identifying real business challenges allows teams to anchor their learning in “doing” and to produce outputs that may be adopted in the business. The goal is to apply new insights and learning in the creation and delivery of well structured projects with clear measures of success that will change the business.

Measure: The number and quality of projects worked on. Also did the programme help to address and resolve real business issues effectively with imaginative solutions based on new insights?

  • Co creation and the involvement of senior leaders/sponsors in the design and delivery – this facilitates a significant degree of ownership and intimacy with the programme and its delegates allowing line manager and sponsors to see change in behaviour and thinking over time.

Measure: Were senior leaders engaged and involved in shaping the programme? How were their needs and perspectives considered? How were senior leaders and sponsors supporting delegates before, during and after the intervention? What changes did sponsors see in delegates?

  • Live testing and experimentation – the translation of insight and ideas into action under experimental conditions is not only a way of understanding if new ideas will work but also another reference point for “ends” and the number of ideas generated, experiments undertaken and new ideas implemented.

Measure: Did the programme include live testing and experimentation? How many experiments, new ideas or new ways of working were tested as a result of the programme?

  • Emotional engagement and reflection – Effective learning is a function of the level of both intellectual as well as emotional engagement. Facilitating interventions such as learning sets allows the delegates to connect at both an intellectual and deeply emotional level. Peer to peer interaction identifies reference points of change from the moment the learning sets start to the moment they finish. Providing ample time for reflection also allows delegates to record their thoughts, feelings, impressions and emotions before a programme starts and again at the end. This can be captured using interview techniques or video recordings.

Measure: Did the programme allow the development of learning relationships that enabled the development of thoughts and feelings as part of the learning journey? Were qualitative observations captured before, during and after the intervention to assess “shift”?

  • Asking and enquiring, not telling – programmes designed to actively engage delegates in the learning process and not transmit knowledge have the opportunity to both see engagement in action and also measure levels of engagement throughout the intervention.

Measure: Did the programme encourage and enable inquiry-led learning driven by participant curiosity? How did that process work (for the delegates) and how did the quality of questioning change individually and collectively over the life of the intervention and beyond? How did the proportion of time shift over the life of the intervention from “transmit” to “converse”?

  • Creating “thirsty learners” – programmes that help delegates learn how to learn have a greater probability of getting feedback from line managers and colleagues in both a formal or informal context. Delegates who are comfortable actively seeking feedback as part of a learning process receive more insight in regard to their own performance.

Measure: Did the programme enable the improvement of your ability to learn that you will be able to transfer and apply in your job? What was the level of active feedback seeking during and post the intervention?

  • Moving away from your comfort zone – delegates invariably learn more from what is unusual or unorthodox to them compared to staying with the familiar. This can be both an extremely rewarding but also very uncomfortable experience (hence the view we hold of avoiding questions which reference a good/bad experience). Learning through discovery and exploring new perspectives is one of the most powerful ways of helping leaders reframe their views.

Measure: identifying the specific insights that came from any discovery experience. How many new insights were generated? How relevant might they be to helping move forward your personal and business challenges?

In Conclusion

The list of design principles referenced is by no means exhaustive and is only a sample of those we use to construct and deliver our work. When executive education is designed with principles like these, traditional “happy sheet” questions become less helpful when seeking to find out if a programme has achieved its real purpose. Given the importance of Executive Development to the future of every business it’s important we move away from simplistic and often misleading measurement methods and adopt a more holistic view of what can be measured based on more enlightened design principles and practices.

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About the authors: 

Alan Matcham – Alan’s passion is to make work fit for people and people fit for work. His experience is focused on Leadership and Management transformation and working to release the untapped potential in all employees.

Tim Coburn – Tim has a special interest in the learning process particularly the way leaders use language, conversation and stories to engage and motivate teams to improve corporate performance. His career has included global culture change roles with the BBC, Motorola, Rolls-Royce and Serco PLC.

Curated by Trevor Lee

International Resourcing Director

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

PIF (PAY IT FORWARD)


pif-1

Problem

There is a lot of expertise in any organization. It often remains within the individual and rarely gets to benefit others in the peer group.

When newer Managers encounter difficulty, they usually don’t know whom to approach.

They are hesitant for various reasons but mainly out of fear of appearing dumb.

There is a need for an informal setup in the organization that promotes collaboration by encouraging the (expert) Managers to coach the (novice) Managers. An internal network if you will.

pif-2

Solution

Problems are a constant for any Manager – how does she solve them? She most often seeks the help of a peer or a senior Manager within the organization. What happens if the senior Manager has a problem?

She asks another one and so on via their internal network (of trust). All it takes to start such a network is for one Manager to help another. Reciprocating help then becomes the normal. In this way all the Managers in the organization will coalesce in a way that no formal roles or hierarchies will. The camaraderie between Managers will be infectious, thanks to this small gesture. It just takes one person to start the process – could that be you?

Practical Impact
• Increased goodwill between Managers within the organization
• Best Practices sharing by an informal network
• Problems get solved as quickly as they arise

Challenges

Bureaucracy is the biggest obstacle. As long as there is no sign of this being an official initiative, the network will become self-sustaining. It may take a while for it to evolve – but once established, it will be very effective in binding the whole management team to a common purpose.

First Steps

As C-suite leaders you should prompt, even start, such an initiative. Just watch it grow – it will be truly empowering both wide and deep within your organization.

pif-3

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

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