Don’t Accept a Job Offer Until You Assess the Organizational Culture.


You got the job. Now for the hard part: deciding whether to take it.

Start by doing due diligence on the organization and its people to learn whether you would enjoy working there.

Ask yourself, “Is this a place where I will be happy? Where I will be challenged? Where I will thrive?”

Reaching out to your contacts and LinkedIn network and ask questions such as “What is the organization like?” and “How long do people stay?”

Find out what happened to the last person who had the job you’ve been offered.

If you can, do a trial run at the company. You can say, “I really want to learn more about this organization. Can I spend a few hours with the team?”

You will not be able to negotiate or change the organization’s culture, of course, but it’s helpful to know beforehand what you’re getting into.

CULTURE 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

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To Motivate Your Employees …


It’s not always easy to get the most from your employees.

If you’re struggling to inspire the people on your team, look to your past.

Think about your own experience and what motivated you when you were in the lower levels of a company.

Who was the best boss you ever had?

What did that person do to make you want to perform at your best?

Reflect on what made your boss’s motivational strategies so effective for you.

What specifically did they do to earn your trust and admiration?

Now think about how you can apply those lessons to your own team. Which motivational tools will work for them?

Be fearless in examining your own behavior and curious about how your employees respond to you. Re-purpose your favorite boss’s techniques and make them your own.

Adapted from “Motivating People Starts with Having the Right Attitude,” by Monique Valcour

MOTIVATE 1

Curated by Trevor Lee

@trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

Lose your EGO to become a LEADER


We all know leaders need to do a lot of things. Have a clear vision is just one of many things being discussed. I couldn’t agree more, but the key is to keep it simple and focus on what we can do as leaders, to make it about the people and be the best example we can be.

It all starts with losing the ego. When we eliminate ego, we can become “a part of” instead of “apart from”. This is crucial in developing trust with your employees. Most people want someone who treats them like they matter and makes them feel “a part of” the team. The following LEADERSHIP acronym has some suggestions and principles to practice, that can help eliminate ego or at least reduce it some.

Listen.

This is our best assessment tool. Listen to your employees or people in general. Everyone has a voice and deserves to be heard. Ask questions and really listen. Look at yourself first. If you are asking others to do something or act a certain way, make sure you are doing it as well. Learn from others. Everyone is capable of teaching us something.

Engage.

Employee engagement has been a popular topic recently. Leaders need to engage with their employees. Be interested. Take a minute when you can and let them know you care. Be an Example. Always.

Assess.

Asses every situation, all issues, obstacles and opportunities. Take appropriate Action based on your assessments.

Develop.

Develop new leaders. This is a must. We need more quality leaders. Be a mentor and show others how it is done. Make good and timely Decisions. Above all else, make a Difference.

Encourage.

Encourage others. It means a lot to be encouraged by a leader. This also sets a good example for other employees to encourage each other. Have Enthusiasm. Show your followers (employees) you are excited about your job as a leader.

Respect.

Show respect for all your employees and staff. They all deserve it, from the CEO to the maintenance person. Recognize and Reward others for their efforts. Be Responsible. Always.

Serve.

Leaders must Serve others. It is not about you. It is about them. Put them first and they will follow you. Always try and Smile and keep a positive attitude. Share your knowledge with everyone.

Help.

Help out when you can. A Hands-on leader will be more liked and respected. Be Honest and practice Humility.

Inspire and Influence others.

As a leader, you can make a huge difference in the lives of others. Believe in them. Give them Hope.

Lead with Passion and a Purpose.

People can tell when you have it and when you don’t. Plan. You have all heard it. When you fail to plan, you plan to fail. Be Prepared for anything. You just never know. Put others first. Always.

These two don’t fit with the acronym, but they are very crucial for leaders. Practice Gratitude and be Optimistic. If we continue to practice the basics, we will not have to “get back to them.”

If we as leaders practice these basic and simple principles, the rest will come a lot easier, your employees will be more likely to “follow the Leader” and the future of leadership will continue to shine brightly

Remember, with ego you are “apart from.” Lose the ego and be “a part of”. It’s a beautiful thing.

 

What do you think ?

EGO 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

The 5 Temptations of a CEO


In his book The five temptations of a CEO: A leadership fable, published in 1998, Patrick Lencioni describes some common traps that can ensnare hard driven executives.

Temptation 1: Choosing status over results

  • Leadership is about producing results, not looking good.

  • The best leaders live to win.

  • They don’t become hostages to their egos.

Temptation 2: Choosing popularity over accountability

  • Good leaders have skills that correct behaviour that does not produce the desired results.

  • Management should be objective rather than subjective.

  • Leaders should work for long-term respect, not affection.

Temptation 3: Choosing certainty over clarity

  • Leaders create clarity when they are decisive.

  • Employees need clarity.

  • Leaders cannot be right all the time.

  • The cost of not taking the risk of being wrong is paralysis.

Temptation 4: Choosing harmony over productive conflict

  • Poor leaders promote consensus when they should be mining and encouraging more conflict.

  • Leaders should encourage “passionate discourse around ideas”.

  • Once a decision is made, however, the team must all back it.

Temptation 5: Choosing invulnerability over trust

  • Leaders often mistakenly believe that they lose their credibility if their people feel too comfortable challenging their ideas.

  • Leaders must make themselves vulnerable, show weakness, admit mistakes, and celebrate other people’s strengths.

TEMP 1

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

Three steps to building a better top team.


When your top team fails to function, it will likely paralyze the whole company.

Few teams function as well as they could. But the stakes get higher with senior-executive teams: dysfunctional ones can slow down, derail, or even paralyze a whole company. McKinsey in their work with top teams at more than 100 leading multinational companies, including surveys with 600 senior executives at 30 of them, they identified three crucial priorities for constructing and managing effective top teams. Getting these priorities right can help drive better business outcomes in areas ranging from customer satisfaction to worker productivity and many more as well.

1. Get the right people on the team . . . and the wrong ones off

Determining the membership of a top team is the CEO’s responsibility—and frequently the most powerful lever to shape a team’s performance. Many CEOs regret not employing this lever early enough or thoroughly enough. Still others neglect it entirely, assuming instead that factors such as titles, pay grades, or an executive’s position on the org chart are enough to warrant default membership. Little surprise, then, that more than one-third of the executives they surveyed said their top teams did not have the right people and capabilities.

The key to getting a top team’s composition right is deciding what contributions the team as a whole, and its members as individuals, must make to achieve an organization’s performance aspirations and then making the necessary changes in the team. This sounds straight-forward, but it typically requires conscious attention and courage from the CEO; otherwise, the top team can under-deliver for an extended period of time.

2. Make sure the top team does just the work only it can do

Many top teams struggle to find purpose and focus. Only 38 percent of the executives McKinsey surveyed said their teams focused on work that truly benefited from a top-team perspective. Only 35 percent said their top teams allocated the right amounts of time among the various topics they considered important, such as strategy and people.

3. Address team dynamics* and processes

A final area demanding unrelenting attention from CEOs is effective team dynamics, whose absence is a frequent problem: among the top teams McKinsey studied, members reported that only about 30 percent of their time was spent in “productive collaboration”—a figure that dropped even more when teams dealt with high-stakes topics where members had differing, entrenched interests.

Correcting dysfunctional dynamics requires focused attention and interventions, preferably as soon as an ineffective pattern shows up.

Finally, most teams need to change their support systems or processes to crystalize and embed change.

Each top team is unique, and every CEO will need to address a unique combination of challenges.

Developing a highly effective top team typically requires good diagnostics, followed by a series of workshops and field work to address the dynamics of the team while it attends to hard business issues. The best top teams will begin to take collective responsibility and to develop the ability to maintain and improve their own effectiveness, creating a lasting performance edge.

© McKinsey & Co • Michiel Kruyt, Judy Malan, and Rachel Tuffield

 

*To build strong teams I recommend:

TGI 2

developed by

The Gabriel Institute

website teamability.com

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

@trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

Establish Trust in your Virtual Team


 You can gauge the health of a virtual team by measuring the average lag time between when team members identify a problem and when they discuss it.

If you and your colleagues don’t trust one another, issues will go unaddressed for much longer than they should.

That’s why it is critical for members of a virtual team to establish trust and a sense of safety up front.

Trusting people is hard when you don’t work with them face-to-face, but even the smallest of gestures can help: Be generous with information.

If someone is struggling with a project or task, be the first to offer help. And when someone on the team has even a minor success, send a congratulatory email.

A little kindness goes a long way in encouraging others to give you the benefit of the doubt

when stresses inevitably arise.

Adapted from “How to Raise Sensitive Issues During a Virtual Meeting,”
by Joseph Grenny

TRUST 4

 

Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

@trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

 

LEADERSHIP FOR A NEW ECONOMY


People need organismic integration !!

It’s the process through which people develop as they engage in their world (organizationally and personally). But when we apply undue pressure to enact organizational change, and fail to garnish their input, do you know what generally happens? ——————————— Rebellion.

High-performing organizational leaders link people in a way that fosters inclusion. Nobody wants the “fifth wheel” label, and perceptive, dream-weaver leaders intuitively grasp this.

Meaningful change occurs when people accept themselves, take interest in why they do what they do, and then decide that they’re ready to do it differently.

Inundated with land mines, the organizational field requires agile players. We need to equip them by linking their minds in the fashion that garnishes a network of idea factories that carpet the organization’s floor. In the words of Steve Jobs,

Innovation comes from people meeting up in the hallways or calling each other at 10:30 at night with a new idea, or because they realized something that shoots holes in how we’ve been thinking about a problem. It’s ad hoc meetings of six people called by someone who thinks he has figured out the coolest new thing ever and who wants to know what other people think of his idea.

Perhaps it’s befitting to share a story that sums up the essence of what kind of leadership the new economy we are in requires.

On September 23rd, 2005, Warren and Pam Adams lost their home when Hurricane Rita slammed ashore in Gilchrist, Texas, with 130 mile per hour winds and a storm surge of seventeen feet. They loved the region and rebuilt on the exact spot, just a few hundred yards from the ocean.

Three years later, history repeated itself.

On September 13th, 2008, Hurricane Ike made landfall in the same location, buffeting the Gilchrist, Texas, coastline with 110 mile per hour winds and an eighteen-foot storm surge.

This hurricane, with its massive wind field, would go down in the history books as the third most costly storm to strike the U.S. mainland. Here’s the interesting part: it destroyed every coastal dwelling near where it made landfall. Except one. The house that the Adams rebuilt.

The structure survived, perfectly intact, because they built it on fourteen-foot pylons. News media outlets dubbed it, “The Last House Standing.”

This story illustrates a poignant certainty. Build your organization on the shifting sand of rhetoric and it won’t survive the onslaught of social, economic, and political waves that crash against its jetty. The latest technology, a rich legacy, and a pile of cash aren’t enough to hold back the raging surf. Rather, dynamic and dream-weaver leaders are the pylons that’ll keep it intact.

But here’s the takeaway. There’s a tectonic shift afoot within social and economic frameworks around the globe. Barriers that stood cemented in place for centuries are crashing down, becoming relics of a time since past.

Therefore, let’s sandblast bravado off the walls of organizations and replace it with—collaboration.

Becoming a vanguard organization means tapping into the deep reservoir of the human mind to promote the exchange of information and experience.

COLLABORATION 2

Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee