Test Your Offer BEFORE You Make It!


Never make a formal offer until every aspect of that offer has been tested and agreed on beforehand. Easy to remember, but hard to fix if you forget. Once you’ve formally extended an offer, you’ve seriously limited your options. The applicant becomes the buyer, the company the seller. Open communication stops dead. Candidates stop thinking about why they want the job and start worrying about why they DON’T want it.

An offer extended while there’s still doubt often gets an “I have to think about it” response. Thinking about an offer is fine – but once you’ve extended it your own flexibility is weakened. It’s much better to have an applicant think about all aspects of an offer BEFORE you formally put it together.

TEST OFFER 1

Here’s another important point: Before you extend a formal offer, you get unbiased information. After, that same attempt to determine a candidate’s interest can come across as harassment, pushiness or over-selling. Contentious salary negotiations become awkward and stressful, because neither party wants to lose face. Deals often fall apart at this point for relatively unimportant reasons.

Start by testing a candidate’s general interest in the position. Ask, “Assuming an attractive offer, do the job and the challenge appeal to you?” This question lets you draw a line between the job and the offer, and gives both parties the chance to address concerns about the job itself. You’ll eliminate a lot of bad fits this way!

Then you can ask, “What would you think if we could put together a package in the range of £_____ to £_____?” You’ll need to go back and forth with the candidate to test the range, but this gets both parties talking in an open manner.

Don’t let the candidate forget about the competition – real or imaginary. Say something like, “Although we’re still seeing other candidates, I believe you’d make a great addition to our team. What do you think about something like £_____?” The threat of competition allows you to be a bit stronger during the negotiating phase, and tends to make the candidate more realistic.

A candidate’s hesitation on any item at this stage means there are probably other issues to be considered. Continue probing. Many objections have to do with lack of information: don’t move forward until you have addressed these concerns to everyone’s satisfaction. Now is the time to make trade-offs and be creative. If you can’t meet a particular need, offer an alternative – a signing bonus instead of a too-high salary, for example. Find out now if this could turn out to be a deal-breaker.

Work on all these points until you come to an agreement – or at least an understanding. You’ll both discover that this give-and-take process is much easier WITHOUT a formal offer on the table. And when all the objections have been addressed in a mutually satisfactory fashion, THEN you’re ready to get to the final offer.

TEST OFFER 2

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

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Hiring Globally Savvy Candidates


Most global companies are looking for leaders who can easily move between countries and cultures, take on assignments abroad, understand disparate markets, and manage diverse teams.

But these leaders aren’t always easy to find.

Start by looking at the candidates in your applicant pool who have lived abroad, and ask them about their backgrounds. Prompt them to assess and discuss the knowledge and skills they acquired through their experience. Did they launch a business or turn a struggling initiative around? What was the nature and depth of the contact they had with the culture and the people? Did they travel there, live and work alone, manage a team and family?

Asking these questions will give you a clearer sense of the candidate’s knowledge of different cultural practices and their ability to understand and communicate with people whose backgrounds differ from their own.

Adapted from “What the Best Cross-Cultural Managers Have in Common,” by Linda Brimm

The above is the passion and purpose of CEO Worldwide

purpose-3

Trevor Lee – EP International

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

We provide C-suite services in the field of talent acquisition, development and retention.

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First Impressions – Don’t Get Fooled


Disastrous hires can happen when managers are fooled by first impressions. But how can you get beyond the superficial during a brief interview?

The key is to focus on behaviors rather than traits. For example, if the interviewee describes them-self as a “team player,” do they credit other people when discussing their work? Look beyond what the candidate is saying and focus on how they are they saying it.

Watch for nonverbal cues that signal contempt, superiority, and disrespect: eye contact when speaking to another person but not when listening to them or invading another’s space.

Another telling question: Ask them to describe their least preferred coworker. Listen for whether they reduce the person to a one-word label (e.g., “difficult” or “micro-manager”) or reveal a more complex view of the situation (e.g., “we disagreed about how to get the job done because we were trained in different ways”).

FOOLED

Adapted from “How to Hire Without Getting Fooled by First Impressions,”

by Tanya Menon and Leigh Thompson

Trevor Lee – EP International

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

We provide C-suite services in the field of talent acquisition, development and retention.

CEO LOGO

Interview Psychology


Does your job depend on making great hires ?

Some years ago we found an outstanding candidate for a C suite position at a leading communications company. This person had an outstanding record of success, had aligned values and was in every respect a perfect fit with their open culture.

Unfortunately, she got a tad nervous with a one on one with the alpha male CEO and was perceived as not being strong enough for the position.

CAT

An emotional decision to reject her was based on that one interview.

Today she is the CEO at a competing company, an industry leader and nightmare competitor.

All great recruiters and hiring managers MUST to do (at least) three things:

1. They must learn to control their own biases and the biases of their clients during the interview.

2. Focus on superior performance and potential.

3. Understand candidate motivation, needs and ultimate ambitions.

TALENT

Trevor Lee – EP International

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

We provide C-suite services in the field of talent acquisition, development and retention.