Establish Trust in your Virtual Team


 You can gauge the health of a virtual team by measuring the average lag time between when team members identify a problem and when they discuss it.

If you and your colleagues don’t trust one another, issues will go unaddressed for much longer than they should.

That’s why it is critical for members of a virtual team to establish trust and a sense of safety up front.

Trusting people is hard when you don’t work with them face-to-face, but even the smallest of gestures can help: Be generous with information.

If someone is struggling with a project or task, be the first to offer help. And when someone on the team has even a minor success, send a congratulatory email.

A little kindness goes a long way in encouraging others to give you the benefit of the doubt

when stresses inevitably arise.

Adapted from “How to Raise Sensitive Issues During a Virtual Meeting,”
by Joseph Grenny

TRUST 4

 

Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

@trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

 

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Empathy


EMPATHY 3

Use Empathy to Improve Your Next Meeting

Improving meetings isn’t just about inviting the right people and being prepared. You also need to employ empathy, an emotional intelligence competency that can help you better manage discussions.

Empathy allows you to read people: Who is supporting whom? Who is coasting? Where is the resistance?

Carefully reading people will also help you understand the conflicts in the group so that you can manage the power dynamics. You may think these sorts of politics are unimportant, but power matters — and it plays out in meetings. Learning to read how the flow of power is moving and shifting can help you lead the group.

It’s your job to make sure people leave your meeting feeling good about what happened, their contributions, and you as the leader.

Adapted from the HBR Emotional Intelligence Series

EMPATHY 2

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Encourage Collaboration – Make It Easier


Collaboration takes time and resources. So if you want people to work together, you have to make it as easy as possible.

For example, you can use simple, off-the-shelf tools like Dropbox and Skype to help people share and communicate. (Be sure that any programs you use work seamlessly with your IT system.)

If some of your employees aren’t confident with the technology, pair them with someone who is. People are much more likely to adopt a new technology if they have someone they can turn to for help, rather than learning it on their own or relying on an IT hotline.

And for major collaboration projects, consider assigning co-leaders who can shoulder the administrative burdens.

Adapted from “How to Get People to Collaborate When You Don’t Control Their Salary,”
by Heidi K. Gardner

MIDDLE

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

The Servant-Leader


Leader or servant? Do the leaders in your organisation have a style tending more toward coercive, persuasive power. Are they larger-than-life figures, or are they more prone to a leadership style based on personal humility and team support?

Larger-than-life leaders have played important roles in the business world, however if you are more comfortable with inclusion rather than coercion, you may be able to evolve a leadership style that is becoming recognized as a requirement for transforming organizations from good to truly great.

Servant leadership, which is based on the premise of service to a purpose larger than self, emphasizes a holistic approach to work; a sense of community, a sharing of power in decision-making and a vision. So how are servant-leaders different?

Servant-leaders possess a mixture of personal humility and professional resolve. They are servants first, and the desire to lead flows from the desire to improve the life and work of those around and under them.

The servant-leader possesses:

  • High emotional intelligence

  • Ability to conceptualize beyond day-to-day concerns

  • Foresight

  • Commitment to the growth of others

  • Creativity

  • Regard for community (consciousness)

  • An ability for healing and restoring others

  • Empathy

  • Positive attitude

While the concept of servant-leadership may seem counter-intuitive to our image of leadership, results show its strength. The good news is that the talented leader can, with help and guidance, develop the skills of the servant-leader and create truly great organizations.

In summary is your organisation on a journey from Command and Control to Coordinate and Cultivate ?

 

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

CEO LOGO

The Best Leaders: Listen – Really Listen


In a world of instantaneous global connection, one of the most authentic modes of communication still is just listening to someone. But listening can be a challenging skill to master. How can you build your ability? Start by creating space in your day. Block off time in your calendar to reflect on a recent conversation and to prepare for the next one. When a colleague or employee asks for advice, make sure you understand the situation. Before answering, ask a question. Clarify what they really need. And give people your full attention. Look them in the eye.

Put down your phone and close your laptop. Leaders who make time for uninterrupted face-to-face conversation find that it’s one of their best management tools. 

Adapted from “Listening Is an Overlooked Leadership Tool,” by Melissa Daimler

LISTEN2

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Question Everything


It can be difficult for leaders (especially senior ones new to their roles) to pause before acting. But when was the last time you stopped to ask, “Why are we doing it that way?” Leaders must constantly explore new ideas and seek out new thinking from those around them. You need to regularly ask uncomfortable questions and think about whether to change or abandon an existing strategy. 

  • The best leaders step back and look at the big picture every so often.

  • They surround themselves with diverse teams and capitalize on opportunities to hear and experiment with new ideas.

  • They give themselves time to surface divergent opinions that ultimately lead to smarter business decisions.

LEADERSHIP 1

Adapted from “When Was the Last Time You Asked, ‘Why Are We Doing It This Way?’”

by Hal Gregersen

Trevor Lee – EP International

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

We provide C-suite services in the field of talent acquisition, development and retention.

CEO LOGO

The Servant Leader


Leader or servant?

Do the leaders in your organisation have a style tending more toward coercive, persuasive power. Are they larger-than-life figures, or are they more prone to a leadership style based on personal humilityand team support?

Larger-than-life leaders have played important roles in the business world, however if you are more comfortable with inclusion rather than coercion, you may be able to evolve a leadership style that is becoming recognized as a requirement for transforming organizations from good to truly great.

Servant leadership, which is based on the premise of service to a purpose larger than self, emphasizes a holistic approach to work; a sense of community, a sharing of power in decision-making and a vision. So how are servant-leaders different?

HANDSHAKE

Servant-leaders possess a mixture of personal humility and professional resolve. They are servants first, and the desire to lead flows from the desire to improve the life and work of those around and under them.

The servant-leader possesses:

  • High emotional intelligence

  • Ability to conceptualize beyond day-to-day concerns

  • Foresight

  • Commitment to the growth of others

  • Creativity

  • Regard for community (consciousness)

  • An ability for healing and restoring others

  • Empathy

  • Positive attitude

While the concept of servant-leadership may seem counter-intuitive to our image of leadership, results show its strength. The good news is that the talented leader can, with help and guidance, develop the skills of the servant-leader and create truly great organizations.

In summary is your organization on a journey from Command and Control to Coordinate and Cultivate ?

 THINKING

Trevor B. Lee, EP International

@TBLepi

Acknowledgements:
http://www.thtconsulting.com,
http://www.greenleaf.org
http://www.servantleadershipcenter.net