Successful Business Transformation


9 implementation principles that will guide you toward a successful transformation:

The problems facing every company are different. They largely depend on history, culture, capabilities, and information technology. However, the importance of vision and communication cannot be overestimated.


Therefore …

A clear vision of the tasks ahead and good communication skills will enable you to navigate around the most difficult obstacles and prevent the organization sliding back into its old habits. The following principles will guide you toward a successful transformation:

  1. Think like a revolutionary

  2. Build an urgent case for change and convince the board

  3. Establish a ‘guiding coalition’

  4. Create a compelling and coherent vision for change

  5. Communicate the vision

  6. Enable and encourage people to change

  7. Look for quick wins

  8. Work around the resistors

  9. Consolidate the gains and maintain the momentum

Ed: These are principals that form the core of my friends at the Beyond Budgeting Institute – bbrt.org – and form the business model of such diverse companies as AstraZeneca, Arla, Danfoss, Handelsbanken, HILTI, Lego, MAERSK, Michelin, Sodexo, SKF, Timpson, Volvo and many more.

But getting back to point number 2,

because it is crucial to discuss how we sell the case for change to the people that matter.

Who are the key ‘influencers’ that you need to convince?

In most companies, the two primary persons to convince will be the CEO and CFO. However, it is of great importance to engage the whole organization. I will get back to that later.

While the case for change might appear to be compelling to you, it can seem too vague and “in the future” for others.

Hard-pressed managers need more organizational change like a hold-in-the-head. Therefore, the reasons must be compelling and the case well prepared and presented.


So how do we convince key influencers?

Ask yourself the following questions:

  1. What will it involve?

  2. What are the costs and benefits?

  3. Which parts of the business are affected?

  4. Is this the only option?

  5. What evidence do we have that it will work?

  6. What are the risks?

  7. How long will it take?

  8. How will we know if we have succeeded or failed?

Addressing them objectively will strengthen your credibility and increase your chances of success even though these questions are difficult to answer. 


Remember …

One common pitfall of implementation is believing that the total transformation of the model can be driven by finance (or any other one function) alone, and failing to engage other parts of organization such as Human Resources or members of the management team.

Author: Anders Olesen – Director, Beyond Budgeting Institute.  E-Mail: info@bbrt.org

transformation

Curated by Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

 

Executive Search 2.0


 Executive Search 2.0 is transparent by design and speedy of execution with 100% customer centricity.
Free whitepaper download:  http://bit.ly/2hRdT4N

I recall the very first conversation I had with Patrick Mataix when I asked him how he entered the world of executive search. I quickly realized I had encountered ‘a meeting of minds’ moment based on an ethical dimension seldom encountered in my traditional world. Here was someone with whom I passionately wished to work.

 

FRUSTRATION!

It was soon established that CEO Worldwide was born out of Patrick’s frustration with the headhunters and consultants he encountered as co-founder and COO of Vistaprint (NASDAQ: CMPR).

EXASPERATION!

Exasperation at their inadequate answers and relaxed approach to deadlines – as much as their lacklustre candidates.

He went on to say that it seemed the recruiters were almost mocking all the time and energy he was investing in developing the business internationally: raising funds, opening subsidiaries, acquiring and restructuring businesses.

He was permanently looking urgently for managers in France, UK, Germany, the US…

All of his problems boiled down to quickly finding the right person, in the right culture, with the right profile, at a reasonable cost; to either help him do things faster and more efficiently, or run a portion of other fast growing business.

While meeting C-level executives, he could clearly see that he was not the only one wasting time and money in endless, costly and infuriating processes, that were highly inadequate for the pace of their international development.

IT WAS TIME FOR A CHANGE

He founded CEO Worldwide in 2001, because as an entrepreneur, he recognized that cross-border executive recruiters could not keep putting themselves before clients and commanding ridiculous fees for the privilege. It was not sustainable then and certainly isn’t now as ‘digital’ enables productivity gains – particularly in terms of financial savings and time-line – to directly flow to the client effectively handing back control. The client is front and center of the CEO Worldwide service culture.

Since then CEO Worldwide have placed 1000s of candidates who have truly revitalized businesses in multiple sectors across the world.

PURPOSE

Our purpose continues to be to offer the C-suite a way of hiring ‘… the best certified executive talent on the planet. at speed, without any up-front financial commitment and for a flat fee unrelated to the agreed remuneration and specific for each region. We do this by constantly adding pre-selected top performers meeting or exceeding our clients’ requirements. For those that are INVITED to the CEO Worldwide community we seek – free of charge – to accord them unrivaled opportunity to showcase their skills both by written word and via a dedicated YouTube platform.

Free whitepaper download:  http://bit.ly/2hRdT4N

search-3

 

Trevor Lee

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

The Epitaph of Managerialism


In today’s guest post Dr Jules Goddard, Fellow of the LBS reminds us that reducing costs is only a means to an end, not a strategy.

He goes on to say …

The art of management is to manage a business in such a way that the need for operational excellence, continuous improvement, “right first time”, cost leadership, process redesign, corporate renewal, cultural change, charismatic leadership, employee engagement and financial incentives is redundant; and the declared pursuit of these objectives counts as a clear admission of failure.

When executives reach for these remedies, you can be sure that the business has been woefully mismanaged and failure cannot be far away. There are no surer signs of the inadequacy and delinquency of corporate leadership than that (1) cost efficiency should be extolled as the dominant issue facing the company, and (2) the tactics of outsourcing, shared services, restructuring and other short-term palliatives are being paraded as the main drivers of profitability.

“You don’t make yogurt; you make the conditions and the yogurt makes itself.” Like that wise saying, you don’t manage costs; you design the business strategy and the strategy establishes the necessary cost base.

Costs are an outcome of the strategy, not the goal of the strategy. Cost efficiency is always relative to a strategy or to a business model, never to a competitor or to an absolute standard or benchmark.

One step ahead
Strategy is, therefore, the skill of staying one step ahead of the need to be efficient. As soon as the firm starts to attract competitors and pressures on cost start to be felt, a winning strategy will already have been invented to ensure that the business is moving into a new, distinctive and unassailable market position in which its quasimonopolistic power enables it to be a price maker, not a price taker or cost cutter.

The true test of the innovative capability of a firm is that it never needs to worry about, let alone wrestle with, the cost competitiveness of its business model. Its creativity and courage are of such a quality that they immunize the firm against ever having to resort to such mundane and mind-sapping activities as cost reduction, business reorganization, zero-based budgeting or change management. The job of accounting is to keep the firm honest to this purpose. Financial accounts should be designed primarily to pick up signs of commoditisation at the earliest possible stage, before strategic damage is done, by detecting any backsliding to policies such as taking cost out, downsizing, restructuring, outsourcing or, indeed, any other management fad that serves only to damage the firm’s strategy.

Time spent on strategies of cost efficiency is time stolen from the much more important and wealth-creative activities of innovation, differentiation and entrepreneurship.

A poor management sees its job as “re-profiling the human capital” to fit the needs of its strategy. If the strategy is stunted and unimaginative, then a proportion of the workforce will inevitably be made redundant. This goes by the euphemism of “headcount reduction”. A gifted management takes the talents of everyone in the organisation as a given and pits its imagination against the challenge of inventing a strategy that makes maximum use of everyone’s capabilities It is questionable whether management has the right to cut the workforce to suit its strategy; its moral legitimacy depends upon its ability to find market opportunities whose capture depends upon applying the talents of the entire workforce.

Indeed, this is the central responsibility of senior management. If it cannot do this (if its only strategy is to cut costs), then it should step down and give other management teams the chance to do so. Put another way, the top management team should start its cost-cutting drive with itself.

Endgame?
“Managerialism” is steeped in an instrumental ethic in which employees are called “human resources” or “human capital” and are treated as factors of production or the agents of stakeholders. Kant’s categorical imperative warns us against treating other people as means rather than ends. In many firms, the prevailing model of management, with its fixation on control, coordination and compliance, has effectively institutionalized the instrumental treatment of other people. Managers typically get to a better result by thinking of the organisation as the means to the fulfilment and betterment of individuals than as an end in itself.

The lead indicators of  strategic failure are typically three:

(1) the notion of “best practice” creeps into the management lexicon,

(2) the practice of bench-marking the performance of competitors takes hold and

(3) business managers are set targets to match or exceed the bench-marked performance of key competitors through the implementation of best practice.

Most firms that go bankrupt are paragons of this style of management. Over the 40 years that GM gradually moved towards Chapter 11, there wasn’t a single quarter in which management missed its cost-reduction targets.

Since 1970, when GM first chose Toyota as its benchmark, its remorseless and unwavering pursuit of operational excellence, cost leadership, worldclass manufacturing and best practice never faltered. Eventually this mindset drove the business bankrupt – as cost-reduction strategies nearly always do, eventually. The story of GM could serve as the epitaph of managerialism.

Jules Goddard (jgoddard@dial.pipex.com), formerly Gresham Professor of Commerce at City University, is currently Fellow at the Centre for Management Development, London Business School

strategy-3

Trevor Lee

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ep-i.net

@trevorblee

Executive Search & Interim Management since 2001
Connecting you with the best certified executive talent on the planet