Don’t Accept a Job Offer Until You Assess the Organizational Culture.


You got the job. Now for the hard part: deciding whether to take it.

Start by doing due diligence on the organization and its people to learn whether you would enjoy working there.

Ask yourself, “Is this a place where I will be happy? Where I will be challenged? Where I will thrive?”

Reaching out to your contacts and LinkedIn network and ask questions such as “What is the organization like?” and “How long do people stay?”

Find out what happened to the last person who had the job you’ve been offered.

If you can, do a trial run at the company. You can say, “I really want to learn more about this organization. Can I spend a few hours with the team?”

You will not be able to negotiate or change the organization’s culture, of course, but it’s helpful to know beforehand what you’re getting into.

CULTURE 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

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To Motivate Employees, Show Them How Their Work Helps Customers


We all want to know that our jobs matter.

When an employee’s work seems lacklustre, or office morale is low, remind them of who their work helps.

Giving someone a concrete picture of their work’s impact can be self-affirming as well as motivational.

Studies have shown that cooks feel more motivated and work harder when they see people eating their food, for example.

Even if the results of your employees’ work aren’t so tangible, giving them specific names and stories of those who’ve benefited from their efforts can offer a window into the good that their work does.

So take time to talk about the customer who is able to make more sales (and therefore a better living) thanks to your company’s software, or the parent who’s driving a safe car thanks to diligence on the assembly line.

The key is to make a direct connection from the employee to those who benefit from their work.

MOTIVATE 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Lose your EGO to become a LEADER


We all know leaders need to do a lot of things. Have a clear vision is just one of many things being discussed. I couldn’t agree more, but the key is to keep it simple and focus on what we can do as leaders, to make it about the people and be the best example we can be.

It all starts with losing the ego. When we eliminate ego, we can become “a part of” instead of “apart from”. This is crucial in developing trust with your employees. Most people want someone who treats them like they matter and makes them feel “a part of” the team. The following LEADERSHIP acronym has some suggestions and principles to practice, that can help eliminate ego or at least reduce it some.

Listen.

This is our best assessment tool. Listen to your employees or people in general. Everyone has a voice and deserves to be heard. Ask questions and really listen. Look at yourself first. If you are asking others to do something or act a certain way, make sure you are doing it as well. Learn from others. Everyone is capable of teaching us something.

Engage.

Employee engagement has been a popular topic recently. Leaders need to engage with their employees. Be interested. Take a minute when you can and let them know you care. Be an Example. Always.

Assess.

Asses every situation, all issues, obstacles and opportunities. Take appropriate Action based on your assessments.

Develop.

Develop new leaders. This is a must. We need more quality leaders. Be a mentor and show others how it is done. Make good and timely Decisions. Above all else, make a Difference.

Encourage.

Encourage others. It means a lot to be encouraged by a leader. This also sets a good example for other employees to encourage each other. Have Enthusiasm. Show your followers (employees) you are excited about your job as a leader.

Respect.

Show respect for all your employees and staff. They all deserve it, from the CEO to the maintenance person. Recognize and Reward others for their efforts. Be Responsible. Always.

Serve.

Leaders must Serve others. It is not about you. It is about them. Put them first and they will follow you. Always try and Smile and keep a positive attitude. Share your knowledge with everyone.

Help.

Help out when you can. A Hands-on leader will be more liked and respected. Be Honest and practice Humility.

Inspire and Influence others.

As a leader, you can make a huge difference in the lives of others. Believe in them. Give them Hope.

Lead with Passion and a Purpose.

People can tell when you have it and when you don’t. Plan. You have all heard it. When you fail to plan, you plan to fail. Be Prepared for anything. You just never know. Put others first. Always.

These two don’t fit with the acronym, but they are very crucial for leaders. Practice Gratitude and be Optimistic. If we continue to practice the basics, we will not have to “get back to them.”

If we as leaders practice these basic and simple principles, the rest will come a lot easier, your employees will be more likely to “follow the Leader” and the future of leadership will continue to shine brightly

Remember, with ego you are “apart from.” Lose the ego and be “a part of”. It’s a beautiful thing.

 

What do you think ?

EGO 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Choose Your Mentee Carefully


When you agree to mentor someone, you’re trading away hours that you could use to pursue your own career goals and spending them on someone else’s.

You don’t want to waste your time, so choose a mentee who you’ll be eager to invest in.

  • Assess potential mentees for curiosity, organization, efficiency, and engagement.

  • Ask candidates to prepare a presentation in their area of expertise, or to join you on a sales call or strategy offsite and then write up their observations.

This will give you a good sense of their thinking process, communication skills, and level of interest.

If they don’t complete the assignment, don’t be annoyed. Instead, breathe a sigh of relief that you avoided taking on an uncommitted protégé.

Adapted from “6 Things Every Mentor Should Do,”
by Vineet Chopra and Sanjay Saint

MENTOR 3

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http:/www.ceoworldwide.com

@trevorblee

LEADERSHIP FOR A NEW ECONOMY


People need organismic integration !!

It’s the process through which people develop as they engage in their world (organizationally and personally). But when we apply undue pressure to enact organizational change, and fail to garnish their input, do you know what generally happens? ——————————— Rebellion.

High-performing organizational leaders link people in a way that fosters inclusion. Nobody wants the “fifth wheel” label, and perceptive, dream-weaver leaders intuitively grasp this.

Meaningful change occurs when people accept themselves, take interest in why they do what they do, and then decide that they’re ready to do it differently.

Inundated with land mines, the organizational field requires agile players. We need to equip them by linking their minds in the fashion that garnishes a network of idea factories that carpet the organization’s floor. In the words of Steve Jobs,

Innovation comes from people meeting up in the hallways or calling each other at 10:30 at night with a new idea, or because they realized something that shoots holes in how we’ve been thinking about a problem. It’s ad hoc meetings of six people called by someone who thinks he has figured out the coolest new thing ever and who wants to know what other people think of his idea.

Perhaps it’s befitting to share a story that sums up the essence of what kind of leadership the new economy we are in requires.

On September 23rd, 2005, Warren and Pam Adams lost their home when Hurricane Rita slammed ashore in Gilchrist, Texas, with 130 mile per hour winds and a storm surge of seventeen feet. They loved the region and rebuilt on the exact spot, just a few hundred yards from the ocean.

Three years later, history repeated itself.

On September 13th, 2008, Hurricane Ike made landfall in the same location, buffeting the Gilchrist, Texas, coastline with 110 mile per hour winds and an eighteen-foot storm surge.

This hurricane, with its massive wind field, would go down in the history books as the third most costly storm to strike the U.S. mainland. Here’s the interesting part: it destroyed every coastal dwelling near where it made landfall. Except one. The house that the Adams rebuilt.

The structure survived, perfectly intact, because they built it on fourteen-foot pylons. News media outlets dubbed it, “The Last House Standing.”

This story illustrates a poignant certainty. Build your organization on the shifting sand of rhetoric and it won’t survive the onslaught of social, economic, and political waves that crash against its jetty. The latest technology, a rich legacy, and a pile of cash aren’t enough to hold back the raging surf. Rather, dynamic and dream-weaver leaders are the pylons that’ll keep it intact.

But here’s the takeaway. There’s a tectonic shift afoot within social and economic frameworks around the globe. Barriers that stood cemented in place for centuries are crashing down, becoming relics of a time since past.

Therefore, let’s sandblast bravado off the walls of organizations and replace it with—collaboration.

Becoming a vanguard organization means tapping into the deep reservoir of the human mind to promote the exchange of information and experience.

COLLABORATION 2

Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

ARE YOU A ‘WETCO’ LEADER?


By which I mean …

Do you demonstrate and deliver on these five key leadership traits:

 

W = Warmth: Simple human kindness

E = Empathy: The ability to sense what another person is feeling

T = Teamwork: The bias against ‘I can do it all by myself’ toward:

‘Let’s work together to make this happen’.

C = Conscientiousness: Detail orientation, including an ability and            willingness to follow through to completion.

O = Optimism: The ability to bounce back and internalise challenges.

 

And not just leaders. These traits are human qualities and essential to ‘making a difference’ in your workplace and society at large.

 

Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http:/ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Question Everything


It can be difficult for leaders (especially senior ones new to their roles) to pause before acting. But when was the last time you stopped to ask, “Why are we doing it that way?” Leaders must constantly explore new ideas and seek out new thinking from those around them. You need to regularly ask uncomfortable questions and think about whether to change or abandon an existing strategy. 

  • The best leaders step back and look at the big picture every so often.

  • They surround themselves with diverse teams and capitalize on opportunities to hear and experiment with new ideas.

  • They give themselves time to surface divergent opinions that ultimately lead to smarter business decisions.

LEADERSHIP 1

Adapted from “When Was the Last Time You Asked, ‘Why Are We Doing It This Way?’”

by Hal Gregersen

Trevor Lee – EP International

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

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