To Motivate Employees, Show Them How Their Work Helps Customers


We all want to know that our jobs matter.

When an employee’s work seems lacklustre, or office morale is low, remind them of who their work helps.

Giving someone a concrete picture of their work’s impact can be self-affirming as well as motivational.

Studies have shown that cooks feel more motivated and work harder when they see people eating their food, for example.

Even if the results of your employees’ work aren’t so tangible, giving them specific names and stories of those who’ve benefited from their efforts can offer a window into the good that their work does.

So take time to talk about the customer who is able to make more sales (and therefore a better living) thanks to your company’s software, or the parent who’s driving a safe car thanks to diligence on the assembly line.

The key is to make a direct connection from the employee to those who benefit from their work.

MOTIVATE 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

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Top tips for the digital world! from Andrew Grill*


1. Learn a new language.  

“To get digital, you have to be digital. Instead of learning Spanish, learn the “language of digital”. If the terms Internet of Things, Blockchain, Cognitive or Cloud leave you scratching your head, research these technologies and understand how they can impact and enhance your company and industry.

2. Walk a digital mile in your competitor’s shoes. 

Alan Mulally (former Ford CEO) was once asked what car he drove. His response: “I make a point to drive a different vehicle every day, including the competition, so I understand the customer’s view”.

You need to do the same! Interact with a competitor via digital channels, then you will see what your competitors are doing and how you compare from a digital standpoint.

3. Look at the composition of your board. Do you have Digital Diversity?

To benefit from digital disruption, you need a board that can see things through a digital lens. So, rotate people on your board with those that have a deep grasp of the digital scene. If the board isn’t ready to be disrupted, put together a digital advisory board to play the role of Digital Non-Exec Director until you are truly ready to shake things up.

4. Increase your intake of news items and topics related to digital transformation from outside your industry. 

How do I learn about the latest happenings in the digital world? Not from my own industry, but from others! Use Twitter and LinkedIn to scan other industry discussions on digital disruption. The paid version of Pocket, also suggests relevant articles, which has been a great way to keep up with the deluge of digital thought leadership and debate produced daily.

*Andrew is Global Managing Partner at IBM, Practical Futurist, TEDx & Keynote Speaker, Board Advisor

DIGITAL AGE

 

via Trevor Lee

http://www.ep-i.net

@trevorblee

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

 

New Managers: Take a Listening Tour to Understand Your Company’s Strategy


When you manage a team, your strategies and goals must align with the priorities of those above you. If you don’t fully understand how your group’s work fits into the bigger picture, consider going on a “listening tour” — a series of conversations with people who can clarify the company’s strategic objectives.

Of course, start with your boss, but also talk with other leaders in the organization, including peers and people lower in the hierarchy. Ask yourself: Who’s been at the company for a long time? Who’s worked closely with the current leadership? Who recently transferred from a company that went through a similar change process?

When you reach out, demonstrate that you have a basic grasp of the strategy and ask for their input. For example, you might say: “I hear you saying that innovation is a priority for my team. Where would you like to see us focus?”

Adapted from the Harvard Business Review Manager’s Handbook

 STRATEGY 3

 

Trevor Lee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Lose your EGO to become a LEADER


We all know leaders need to do a lot of things. Have a clear vision is just one of many things being discussed. I couldn’t agree more, but the key is to keep it simple and focus on what we can do as leaders, to make it about the people and be the best example we can be.

It all starts with losing the ego. When we eliminate ego, we can become “a part of” instead of “apart from”. This is crucial in developing trust with your employees. Most people want someone who treats them like they matter and makes them feel “a part of” the team. The following LEADERSHIP acronym has some suggestions and principles to practice, that can help eliminate ego or at least reduce it some.

Listen.

This is our best assessment tool. Listen to your employees or people in general. Everyone has a voice and deserves to be heard. Ask questions and really listen. Look at yourself first. If you are asking others to do something or act a certain way, make sure you are doing it as well. Learn from others. Everyone is capable of teaching us something.

Engage.

Employee engagement has been a popular topic recently. Leaders need to engage with their employees. Be interested. Take a minute when you can and let them know you care. Be an Example. Always.

Assess.

Asses every situation, all issues, obstacles and opportunities. Take appropriate Action based on your assessments.

Develop.

Develop new leaders. This is a must. We need more quality leaders. Be a mentor and show others how it is done. Make good and timely Decisions. Above all else, make a Difference.

Encourage.

Encourage others. It means a lot to be encouraged by a leader. This also sets a good example for other employees to encourage each other. Have Enthusiasm. Show your followers (employees) you are excited about your job as a leader.

Respect.

Show respect for all your employees and staff. They all deserve it, from the CEO to the maintenance person. Recognize and Reward others for their efforts. Be Responsible. Always.

Serve.

Leaders must Serve others. It is not about you. It is about them. Put them first and they will follow you. Always try and Smile and keep a positive attitude. Share your knowledge with everyone.

Help.

Help out when you can. A Hands-on leader will be more liked and respected. Be Honest and practice Humility.

Inspire and Influence others.

As a leader, you can make a huge difference in the lives of others. Believe in them. Give them Hope.

Lead with Passion and a Purpose.

People can tell when you have it and when you don’t. Plan. You have all heard it. When you fail to plan, you plan to fail. Be Prepared for anything. You just never know. Put others first. Always.

These two don’t fit with the acronym, but they are very crucial for leaders. Practice Gratitude and be Optimistic. If we continue to practice the basics, we will not have to “get back to them.”

If we as leaders practice these basic and simple principles, the rest will come a lot easier, your employees will be more likely to “follow the Leader” and the future of leadership will continue to shine brightly

Remember, with ego you are “apart from.” Lose the ego and be “a part of”. It’s a beautiful thing.

 

What do you think ?

EGO 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Establish Trust in your Virtual Team


 You can gauge the health of a virtual team by measuring the average lag time between when team members identify a problem and when they discuss it.

If you and your colleagues don’t trust one another, issues will go unaddressed for much longer than they should.

That’s why it is critical for members of a virtual team to establish trust and a sense of safety up front.

Trusting people is hard when you don’t work with them face-to-face, but even the smallest of gestures can help: Be generous with information.

If someone is struggling with a project or task, be the first to offer help. And when someone on the team has even a minor success, send a congratulatory email.

A little kindness goes a long way in encouraging others to give you the benefit of the doubt

when stresses inevitably arise.

Adapted from “How to Raise Sensitive Issues During a Virtual Meeting,”
by Joseph Grenny

TRUST 4

 

Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

@trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

 

Nine Ways to Identify Natural Leaders


A thought piece for the digital age by Dr. Gary Hamel *

The need to empower natural leaders isn’t an HR pipedream, it’s a competitive imperative. But before you can empower them, you have to find them.

In most companies, the formal hierarchy is a matter of public record—it’s easy to discover who’s in charge of what. By contrast, natural leaders don’t appear on any organization chart. To hunt them down, you need to know . . .

Whose advice is sought most often on any particular topic?

Who responds most promptly to requests from peers?

Whose responses are judged most helpful?

Who is most likely to reach across organizational boundaries to aid a colleague?

Whose opinions are most valued, internally and externally?

Who gets the most kudos from customers?

Who’s the most densely connected to other employees?

Who’s generating the most buzz outside the company?

Who consistently demonstrates real thought leadership?

Who seems truly critical to key decisions?

A lot of the data you need to answer these questions is lurking in the weeds of your company’s email system, or can be found on the Web. Nevertheless, it will take some creative effort and software tweaks to ferret it out.

A few suggestions . . .

  1. Establish a directory of key words corresponding to critical skills and competencies within your company, and then see who generates or receives the most emails on any particular topic.

  2. Add a small box at the end of every incoming email that lets the recipient grade the sender’s response: was it timely, was it helpful?

  3. Analyze internal email flows to see which folks are most likely to respond positively to emails from colleagues in other divisions—who’s collaborating across unit boundaries?

  1. Create a system for ranking the frequency and value of each employee’s contributions to internal wikis or communities of practice.

  2. Encourage employees to write internal blogs, and to rank posts and comments.

  3. Using key words, analyze company emails to see who’s had the most to say about important corporate decisions, and to see how widely those views have been disseminated and discussed.

  4. Identify emails relating to key projects and then identify the individuals who were the most critical “nodes” in the project team—the folks who seemed to be in the middle of every email exchange.

  5. Review incoming emails from customers to determine who’s getting the most requests for help, who’s been most responsive and who’s receiving the most praise. Or, give customers the ability to immediately score the email responses they get from company personnel.

  6. Use news tracking to find out which employees are getting quoted most often online, and who’s showing up most often in the press.

There are other types of data that might also be useful—but you get the idea.

Sure, there are some practical challenges in collecting and analyzing this sorts of data. But ultimately, it should be possible for a company to create a multivariate leadership score for every employee.

Obviously, the old top-down hierarchy isn’t going to disappear any time soon. What would happen, though, if every employee had the chance to compete for leadership “points,” whether or not they had a management job? What would happen if everyone’s leadership score showed up in their online profile—so everyone knew how their colleagues ranked on expertise, helpfulness, collaboration and thought leadership? What would happen if anyone could attach a public comment to a colleague’s leadership score? What about including highly rated “natural” leaders in every important decision meeting? And finally, what would happen if leadership points were considered in compensation and promotion decisions? I’m not sure, but I bet it would do more good than harm.

One thing’s certain, though: we can’t invent Management 2.0 without inventing some new ways for people to accumulate and exercise authority. In the tempestuous seas of today’s creative economy, top-down leadership structures are fast becoming a liability. We need is a new currency of power—one based not on titles, but on every individual’s capacity to lead, every day. We need fewer zero-sum battles for plum positions, in which Machiavellian maneuvering wins the day, and more positive-sum competition to increase one’s personal leadership score—by delivering real value to colleagues and customers. We need a system that forces titled leaders to justify their positional power by competing in an open market for leadership esteem. And finally, we need organizations that aren’t built around a single, dominant hierarchy, but are comprised of many soft hierarchies, each corresponding to a critical skill or issue.

A few years back, two of my colleagues at the London Business School posed a cheeky question in the title of their leadership book: “Why,” they wondered, “should anyone be led by you?” If you reflect on this question every morning, your leadership score is bound to go up.

* Dr. Gary P. Hamel is an American management expert. He is a founder of Strategos, an international management consulting firm based in Chicago.

HAMEL 1

Curated by Trevor Lee

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@trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

ARE YOU A ‘WETCO’ LEADER?


By which I mean …

Do you demonstrate and deliver on these five key leadership traits:

 

W = Warmth: Simple human kindness

E = Empathy: The ability to sense what another person is feeling

T = Teamwork: The bias against ‘I can do it all by myself’ toward:

‘Let’s work together to make this happen’.

C = Conscientiousness: Detail orientation, including an ability and            willingness to follow through to completion.

O = Optimism: The ability to bounce back and internalise challenges.

 

And not just leaders. These traits are human qualities and essential to ‘making a difference’ in your workplace and society at large.

 

Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http:/ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee