Leadership Presence


Increasing your Leadership Presence involves complex, interrelated factors.

  1. Identify and clarify your vision of the future, not only for yourself but for those you lead, or want to lead. Document your vision (in writing!) and then communicate it in a way that inspires people to follow it.

  2. Consider how you appear to others. Start with your appearance, but give more than a passing glance at your inner self and soul (or whatever you call that intangible part of you that projects your values.) Do something to improve at least one of the above, every day.

  3. Get some practice in leaving decisions to other people, especially to those who really want to contribute in the way that decision-making requires. (This sounds easier than it is. People who want to lead generally like to be in control.)

Leadership Presence is a path, not a destination.

LEADERSHIP PRES 1

Curated by Trevor Lee
tblee@ep-i.net
http://www.ep-i.net
@trevorblee

 

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Six Attributes of Collaborative Leaders


These 6 attributes may not be the familiar leadership competences taught at many business schools but it is my belief that they underpin success in today’s collaborative world.

1. Patience
The terrain will change, but collaborative leaders are patient with their partners and with themselves. Your direction may be clear, but you will need a flexible approach to getting there and accept that this will take time.

2. Collective decision making
Decisions made by leaders in isolation and enforced by hierarchical power aren’t sustainable in today’s world. Inclusive decision making informed by bottom up data is key.

3. Quick thinking
You need to be able to see both opportunities and risks before others do, and act in response to them. This requires a quick intellect, and the confidence and courage to implement new ideas whilst taking people with you.

4. Tenacity
The world we describe isn’t a stable one. Governments come and go; dramatic events happen, you cannot produce a detailed plan of action and expect to see it through step by step. Successful collaborative leaders are tenacious in the pursuit of results that deliver the overall common purpose.

5. Building relationships
Collaborative leaders go out to find future partners, identify sponsors, make new alliances – and are prepared to do all this in unexpected places. They invest energy in doing this sort of networking activity ahead of time, so they can call on these relationships when the pressure is on.

6. Handling conflict
Interdependent relationships are multi-layered and always contain seeds of possible conflict. Collaborative leaders don’t see conflict as a mark of failure – rather it is part of the territory, and they are confident in holding the difficult but necessary conversations that help to bring about a resolution.

COLLABORATIVE LEADERSHIP 1

Trevor Lee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Make Gender Balance a Smart Strategic Goal


If you are working on launching or accelerating a push for more gender balance in your company, you need to focus on the opportunity – not the problem – to engage others. Approach the conversation by first laying out a set of future objectives, targets, and milestones. Then describe how gender balance is a key lever to help you reach those goals.

It helps to consider a two key questions:

1) Are you using language that accuses or language that invites people to build skills and enhance leadership impact?

2) Are you engaging with managers on things they understand are central to both their individual success and the company’s goals? Or are your efforts being perceived as politically correct, tick-the-box exercises?

Remember: the final goal isn’t just about balance. It’s having more engaged employees and more connected customers.

Adapted from “Tackle Bias in Your Company Without Making People Defensive,”
by Avivah Wittenberg-Cox

 

Curated by Trevor Lee

@trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

Top tips for the digital world! from Andrew Grill*


1. Learn a new language.  

“To get digital, you have to be digital. Instead of learning Spanish, learn the “language of digital”. If the terms Internet of Things, Blockchain, Cognitive or Cloud leave you scratching your head, research these technologies and understand how they can impact and enhance your company and industry.

2. Walk a digital mile in your competitor’s shoes. 

Alan Mulally (former Ford CEO) was once asked what car he drove. His response: “I make a point to drive a different vehicle every day, including the competition, so I understand the customer’s view”.

You need to do the same! Interact with a competitor via digital channels, then you will see what your competitors are doing and how you compare from a digital standpoint.

3. Look at the composition of your board. Do you have Digital Diversity?

To benefit from digital disruption, you need a board that can see things through a digital lens. So, rotate people on your board with those that have a deep grasp of the digital scene. If the board isn’t ready to be disrupted, put together a digital advisory board to play the role of Digital Non-Exec Director until you are truly ready to shake things up.

4. Increase your intake of news items and topics related to digital transformation from outside your industry. 

How do I learn about the latest happenings in the digital world? Not from my own industry, but from others! Use Twitter and LinkedIn to scan other industry discussions on digital disruption. The paid version of Pocket, also suggests relevant articles, which has been a great way to keep up with the deluge of digital thought leadership and debate produced daily.

*Andrew is Global Managing Partner at IBM, Practical Futurist, TEDx & Keynote Speaker, Board Advisor

DIGITAL AGE

 

via Trevor Lee

http://www.ep-i.net

@trevorblee

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

 

Choose Your Mentee Carefully


When you agree to mentor someone, you’re trading away hours that you could use to pursue your own career goals and spending them on someone else’s.

You don’t want to waste your time, so choose a mentee who you’ll be eager to invest in.

  • Assess potential mentees for curiosity, organization, efficiency, and engagement.

  • Ask candidates to prepare a presentation in their area of expertise, or to join you on a sales call or strategy offsite and then write up their observations.

This will give you a good sense of their thinking process, communication skills, and level of interest.

If they don’t complete the assignment, don’t be annoyed. Instead, breathe a sigh of relief that you avoided taking on an uncommitted protégé.

Adapted from “6 Things Every Mentor Should Do,”
by Vineet Chopra and Sanjay Saint

MENTOR 3

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http:/www.ceoworldwide.com

@trevorblee

Empathy


EMPATHY 3

Use Empathy to Improve Your Next Meeting

Improving meetings isn’t just about inviting the right people and being prepared. You also need to employ empathy, an emotional intelligence competency that can help you better manage discussions.

Empathy allows you to read people: Who is supporting whom? Who is coasting? Where is the resistance?

Carefully reading people will also help you understand the conflicts in the group so that you can manage the power dynamics. You may think these sorts of politics are unimportant, but power matters — and it plays out in meetings. Learning to read how the flow of power is moving and shifting can help you lead the group.

It’s your job to make sure people leave your meeting feeling good about what happened, their contributions, and you as the leader.

Adapted from the HBR Emotional Intelligence Series

EMPATHY 2

Trevor Lee

tblee@ceo-worldwide.com

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Successful Business Transformation


9 implementation principles that will guide you toward a successful transformation:

The problems facing every company are different. They largely depend on history, culture, capabilities, and information technology. However, the importance of vision and communication cannot be overestimated.


Therefore …

A clear vision of the tasks ahead and good communication skills will enable you to navigate around the most difficult obstacles and prevent the organization sliding back into its old habits. The following principles will guide you toward a successful transformation:

  1. Think like a revolutionary

  2. Build an urgent case for change and convince the board

  3. Establish a ‘guiding coalition’

  4. Create a compelling and coherent vision for change

  5. Communicate the vision

  6. Enable and encourage people to change

  7. Look for quick wins

  8. Work around the resistors

  9. Consolidate the gains and maintain the momentum

Ed: These are principals that form the core of my friends at the Beyond Budgeting Institute – bbrt.org – and form the business model of such diverse companies as AstraZeneca, Arla, Danfoss, Handelsbanken, HILTI, Lego, MAERSK, Michelin, Sodexo, SKF, Timpson, Volvo and many more.

But getting back to point number 2,

because it is crucial to discuss how we sell the case for change to the people that matter.

Who are the key ‘influencers’ that you need to convince?

In most companies, the two primary persons to convince will be the CEO and CFO. However, it is of great importance to engage the whole organization. I will get back to that later.

While the case for change might appear to be compelling to you, it can seem too vague and “in the future” for others.

Hard-pressed managers need more organizational change like a hold-in-the-head. Therefore, the reasons must be compelling and the case well prepared and presented.


So how do we convince key influencers?

Ask yourself the following questions:

  1. What will it involve?

  2. What are the costs and benefits?

  3. Which parts of the business are affected?

  4. Is this the only option?

  5. What evidence do we have that it will work?

  6. What are the risks?

  7. How long will it take?

  8. How will we know if we have succeeded or failed?

Addressing them objectively will strengthen your credibility and increase your chances of success even though these questions are difficult to answer. 


Remember …

One common pitfall of implementation is believing that the total transformation of the model can be driven by finance (or any other one function) alone, and failing to engage other parts of organization such as Human Resources or members of the management team.

Author: Anders Olesen – Director, Beyond Budgeting Institute.  E-Mail: info@bbrt.org

transformation

Curated by Trevor Lee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee