New Managers: Take a Listening Tour to Understand Your Company’s Strategy


When you manage a team, your strategies and goals must align with the priorities of those above you. If you don’t fully understand how your group’s work fits into the bigger picture, consider going on a “listening tour” — a series of conversations with people who can clarify the company’s strategic objectives.

Of course, start with your boss, but also talk with other leaders in the organization, including peers and people lower in the hierarchy. Ask yourself: Who’s been at the company for a long time? Who’s worked closely with the current leadership? Who recently transferred from a company that went through a similar change process?

When you reach out, demonstrate that you have a basic grasp of the strategy and ask for their input. For example, you might say: “I hear you saying that innovation is a priority for my team. Where would you like to see us focus?”

Adapted from the Harvard Business Review Manager’s Handbook

 STRATEGY 3

 

Trevor Lee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Advertisements

Lose your EGO to become a LEADER


We all know leaders need to do a lot of things. Have a clear vision is just one of many things being discussed. I couldn’t agree more, but the key is to keep it simple and focus on what we can do as leaders, to make it about the people and be the best example we can be.

It all starts with losing the ego. When we eliminate ego, we can become “a part of” instead of “apart from”. This is crucial in developing trust with your employees. Most people want someone who treats them like they matter and makes them feel “a part of” the team. The following LEADERSHIP acronym has some suggestions and principles to practice, that can help eliminate ego or at least reduce it some.

Listen.

This is our best assessment tool. Listen to your employees or people in general. Everyone has a voice and deserves to be heard. Ask questions and really listen. Look at yourself first. If you are asking others to do something or act a certain way, make sure you are doing it as well. Learn from others. Everyone is capable of teaching us something.

Engage.

Employee engagement has been a popular topic recently. Leaders need to engage with their employees. Be interested. Take a minute when you can and let them know you care. Be an Example. Always.

Assess.

Asses every situation, all issues, obstacles and opportunities. Take appropriate Action based on your assessments.

Develop.

Develop new leaders. This is a must. We need more quality leaders. Be a mentor and show others how it is done. Make good and timely Decisions. Above all else, make a Difference.

Encourage.

Encourage others. It means a lot to be encouraged by a leader. This also sets a good example for other employees to encourage each other. Have Enthusiasm. Show your followers (employees) you are excited about your job as a leader.

Respect.

Show respect for all your employees and staff. They all deserve it, from the CEO to the maintenance person. Recognize and Reward others for their efforts. Be Responsible. Always.

Serve.

Leaders must Serve others. It is not about you. It is about them. Put them first and they will follow you. Always try and Smile and keep a positive attitude. Share your knowledge with everyone.

Help.

Help out when you can. A Hands-on leader will be more liked and respected. Be Honest and practice Humility.

Inspire and Influence others.

As a leader, you can make a huge difference in the lives of others. Believe in them. Give them Hope.

Lead with Passion and a Purpose.

People can tell when you have it and when you don’t. Plan. You have all heard it. When you fail to plan, you plan to fail. Be Prepared for anything. You just never know. Put others first. Always.

These two don’t fit with the acronym, but they are very crucial for leaders. Practice Gratitude and be Optimistic. If we continue to practice the basics, we will not have to “get back to them.”

If we as leaders practice these basic and simple principles, the rest will come a lot easier, your employees will be more likely to “follow the Leader” and the future of leadership will continue to shine brightly

Remember, with ego you are “apart from.” Lose the ego and be “a part of”. It’s a beautiful thing.

 

What do you think ?

EGO 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

Decisions: Avoid Confirmation Bias


As a leader, it’s a rare luxury to have all of the relevant data before making a decision.

More often you make a call with incomplete information, which leaves you open to confirmation bias — meaning you pay attention to data that supports the decision you’ve made and dismiss data that does not.

To avoid this trap, take some time before executing your decision and ask yourself what would’ve happened if you’d made the opposite choice.

Gather the data you would need to defend this opposite view, and compare it with the data used to support your original decision.

Reevaluate your decision in light of the bigger data set.

Your perspective may still be incomplete, but it will be much more balanced.

Adapted from “Root Out Bias from Your Decision-Making Process,”
by Thomas C. Redman

DECIDE 2

Curated by Trevor Lee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee

The 5 Temptations of a CEO


In his book The five temptations of a CEO: A leadership fable, published in 1998, Patrick Lencioni describes some common traps that can ensnare hard driven executives.

Temptation 1: Choosing status over results

  • Leadership is about producing results, not looking good.

  • The best leaders live to win.

  • They don’t become hostages to their egos.

Temptation 2: Choosing popularity over accountability

  • Good leaders have skills that correct behaviour that does not produce the desired results.

  • Management should be objective rather than subjective.

  • Leaders should work for long-term respect, not affection.

Temptation 3: Choosing certainty over clarity

  • Leaders create clarity when they are decisive.

  • Employees need clarity.

  • Leaders cannot be right all the time.

  • The cost of not taking the risk of being wrong is paralysis.

Temptation 4: Choosing harmony over productive conflict

  • Poor leaders promote consensus when they should be mining and encouraging more conflict.

  • Leaders should encourage “passionate discourse around ideas”.

  • Once a decision is made, however, the team must all back it.

Temptation 5: Choosing invulnerability over trust

  • Leaders often mistakenly believe that they lose their credibility if their people feel too comfortable challenging their ideas.

  • Leaders must make themselves vulnerable, show weakness, admit mistakes, and celebrate other people’s strengths.

TEMP 1

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

Three steps to building a better top team.


When your top team fails to function, it will likely paralyze the whole company.

Few teams function as well as they could. But the stakes get higher with senior-executive teams: dysfunctional ones can slow down, derail, or even paralyze a whole company. McKinsey in their work with top teams at more than 100 leading multinational companies, including surveys with 600 senior executives at 30 of them, they identified three crucial priorities for constructing and managing effective top teams. Getting these priorities right can help drive better business outcomes in areas ranging from customer satisfaction to worker productivity and many more as well.

1. Get the right people on the team . . . and the wrong ones off

Determining the membership of a top team is the CEO’s responsibility—and frequently the most powerful lever to shape a team’s performance. Many CEOs regret not employing this lever early enough or thoroughly enough. Still others neglect it entirely, assuming instead that factors such as titles, pay grades, or an executive’s position on the org chart are enough to warrant default membership. Little surprise, then, that more than one-third of the executives they surveyed said their top teams did not have the right people and capabilities.

The key to getting a top team’s composition right is deciding what contributions the team as a whole, and its members as individuals, must make to achieve an organization’s performance aspirations and then making the necessary changes in the team. This sounds straight-forward, but it typically requires conscious attention and courage from the CEO; otherwise, the top team can under-deliver for an extended period of time.

2. Make sure the top team does just the work only it can do

Many top teams struggle to find purpose and focus. Only 38 percent of the executives McKinsey surveyed said their teams focused on work that truly benefited from a top-team perspective. Only 35 percent said their top teams allocated the right amounts of time among the various topics they considered important, such as strategy and people.

3. Address team dynamics* and processes

A final area demanding unrelenting attention from CEOs is effective team dynamics, whose absence is a frequent problem: among the top teams McKinsey studied, members reported that only about 30 percent of their time was spent in “productive collaboration”—a figure that dropped even more when teams dealt with high-stakes topics where members had differing, entrenched interests.

Correcting dysfunctional dynamics requires focused attention and interventions, preferably as soon as an ineffective pattern shows up.

Finally, most teams need to change their support systems or processes to crystalize and embed change.

Each top team is unique, and every CEO will need to address a unique combination of challenges.

Developing a highly effective top team typically requires good diagnostics, followed by a series of workshops and field work to address the dynamics of the team while it attends to hard business issues. The best top teams will begin to take collective responsibility and to develop the ability to maintain and improve their own effectiveness, creating a lasting performance edge.

© McKinsey & Co • Michiel Kruyt, Judy Malan, and Rachel Tuffield

 

*To build strong teams I recommend:

TGI 2

developed by

The Gabriel Institute

website teamability.com

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

@trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

Choose Your Mentee Carefully


When you agree to mentor someone, you’re trading away hours that you could use to pursue your own career goals and spending them on someone else’s.

You don’t want to waste your time, so choose a mentee who you’ll be eager to invest in.

  • Assess potential mentees for curiosity, organization, efficiency, and engagement.

  • Ask candidates to prepare a presentation in their area of expertise, or to join you on a sales call or strategy offsite and then write up their observations.

This will give you a good sense of their thinking process, communication skills, and level of interest.

If they don’t complete the assignment, don’t be annoyed. Instead, breathe a sigh of relief that you avoided taking on an uncommitted protégé.

Adapted from “6 Things Every Mentor Should Do,”
by Vineet Chopra and Sanjay Saint

MENTOR 3

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http:/www.ceoworldwide.com

@trevorblee

Pursue a Second Career — Without Having to Leave Your First One


Do you dream about changing careers but worry that the costs of switching are too high — and that the possibility of success seems too remote?

Instead of plugging away in your current job, unfulfilled and slowly burning out, do both: Keep your current job while pursuing your new career.

You don’t have to forgo sleep if you can find ways to enhance your existing role with your new pursuit.

For example, if you’re interested in becoming a public speaker, look for ways to build your presentation skills within your current company.

Volunteer to take on the next company-wide presentation or join a panel at a conference.

When you follow your curiosities, you’re more likely to feel fulfilled in life — and to be more satisfied in all of your roles.

Adapted from “Why You Should Have (at Least) Two Careers,” by Kabir Sehgal

LEADERSHIP PRES 1

Curated by Trevor Lee

https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorblee

http://www.ep-i.net

http://www.ceo-worldwide.com

@trevorblee